Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Question of the Week (11/19/10)

There will be a quiz on the second half of Book the Second on Tuesday 11/23 (Chapters 15-24).

Choose ONE of the following and answer completely. Use at least three quotes from the text in MLA format.

1) By now, you are fully acquainted with Madame Defarge's appearance, motivation, and intentions. Dickens uses Madame Defarge to contrast to Lucie Manette. He reveals their characters through imagery, dialogue, and figurative language. Compare and contrast the two women and include the following attributes: their appearance, feelings toward other characters, character traits, goals in life, actions, and the narrator's comments (i.e. what does Dickens reveal to the reader about them).

2) Dickens uses Jarvis Lorry and Miss Pross as protectors and caretakers of Lucie Manette. Using evidence from the text, cite 3 examples in MLA format to support this.

3) An overarching theme in A Tale of Two Cities is the corruption of the ruling class and its long lasting and devastating effects on the lower class. Using evidence from the text, cite 3 examples in MLA format to support this theme.

16 comments:

erbear508 said...

In the exchange between Miss Pross and Mr. Lorry, they both show their affecction and dedication for the protection of Lucie Manette. When Miis Pross says: "Yes, I am very much put out" (100), Mr. Lorry inquires why and she explains: "I don't want dozens of people who are not at all worthy of Ladybird, to come here looking after her" (101). This shows that Miss Pross is not only angry that she has to deal with dozens of people, but also that she believes her mistress to be above them all. Often people think the ones they love are too good for them because they want to protect them. Mr. Lorry shows his wanting to protect Lucie also when Miss Pross is done explaining; "'Dear me!' said Mr. Lorry, as the safest remark he could think of." (101) Clearly Mr. Lorry has the same intensions as Miss Pross he is just more quiet about them!

Parker Gardner said...

Throughout the book A Tale Of Two Cities there are many examples of the corruption and cruelness of the upper class and its effects on the lower class of France. One example of this is when a carless aristocrat recklessly careens through the narrow streets of Paris with fatal consequences. As he rounds a corner he runs down and kills a child under his wheel. All he has to say to the bereaved father is “it is extraordinary to me that you people cannot take care of yourselves and your children. One or the other of you is forever in the way. How do I know what injury you have done my horses? (and then) I would ride over all of you willingly and exterminate you from this earth” (116) the aristocrat’s cruel and oppressive words and actions result in the father of the child finding and killing the aristocrat. Another example of upper class corruption is found in the description of a wealthy lord and his trappings of extravagance. “it took four men…the chief of them unable to exist without two gold watches…to conduct the chocolate to Monseigneur’s lips.” (110) This level of unnecessary luxury in contrast with how the people of France were living at the time shows the corruption of the upper class and the reasons for the tension and anger between the two classes. A final example of the effects of the corruption of the upper class on the lower class is found in the treatment of a certain villain Foulon. (With regard to Foulon) “Dragged, and struck at, and stifled by the bunches of grass and straw that were thrust into his face by hundreds of hands, torn bruised, panting, bleed, yet always entreating and beseeching for mercy.” (223) This brutal yet common felt as justifiable treatment of the aristocrat shows the anger and passion of the lower class and the effects of the upper class’s years of oppressing the lower class. I agree with Erin that both Mr. lorry and Miss Pross are dedicated to and try to protect Lucie. They both care about her and want nothing but the best for her.

anthony said...

I agree with the first comment that the exchanges Mr. Lorry and Miss Pross often show how much both of them care about her. The first time Miss Pross shows up, after Mr. Lorry accidentally makes Lucie pass out, she gets mad at him and says "couldn't you tell her what you had to tell her without frightening her to death?"(35). Later, When Mr. Lorry is talking to Miss Pross at Lucie's house, Miss Pross says "I am very much put out about my lady bird"(100). This was in response to Jarvis asking how she was, so it shows how even the mood she's in depends on Lucie. She is the only thing Miss Pross thinks about. Another example of Mr. Lorry being a guardian of Lucie is when Stryver tells Mr. Lorry his plan to marry her. Mr. Lorry immediately responds, "Oh, dear me!"(147). He does not want Stryver to marry Lucie and convinces him not to. This shows how much he cares about her, and the fact that Stryver decides to talk to Mr. Lorry about it shows how other characters consider him to be a sort of caretaker of Lucie.

Carl Tischbein said...

I agree with both Anthony and the first comment in that both Mr. Lorry and Ms. Pross are protectors of Lucie. The first example can be found when Mr. Lorry tells Lucie about her father: "But [Dr. Mannette] has been - been found. He is alive" (34). Although he manages the family's affairs, he did not have to tell her personally or even take her to Paris. Obviously he is caring for her. When Lucie faints at the news, Ms. Pross soon jumps in and addresses the servants - "Why don't you go and fetch things, instead of standing there staring at me? ...If you don't bring the smelling-salts, cold water, and vinegar, quick, I will" (34). She then goes on to Lucie, "calling her 'my precious!' and 'my bird!' and spreading her golden hair aside over her shoulders with great pride and care" (34). Later, Ms. Pross also talks about Lucie - "I don't wan dozens of people who are not at all worthy of Ladybird, to come here looking after her" (101). Obviously both Ms. Pross and Jarvis Lorry care for and take care of Lucie.

Haiti quilter said...

I agree with carl. The quotes that he uses really illustrate the loving and protective sides of mr.lorry and mr.pross. The first example of this is when lucie tells Mr.Lorry that she thinks that he was the one to bring her from france to england as a child. He responds "Miss manette it was I"(32). He must have really cared for her, and for her father to go as far as to travel with her across an ocean. Jarvas Lorry always makes sure that everyone knows that "I have no feelings, and that all the realations I hold with my fellow-creatures are meer business realtions"(32). But by repeating over and over again that business is not personal he is really just convincing everyone that he really does care for his clients, especially lucie. Ms.Pross is another character who cares deeply for lucie and would rather die than see harm be-fall her. "couldn't you tell her what you had to tell her without frightening her to death? Look at her with her pretty face and cold hands. Do you call that being a banker"(35). She is obviously cares very deeply for lucie and will viciously turn on any who harms her in the smallest way.

Parker said...

"I will hear no disrespectful word of that young lady from any lips" (148, Jarvis Lorry) This is in response to Mr. Stryver's comments about Lucy. Jarvis Lorry had advised Mr. Stryver to not propose to Lucy just yet. Mr. Lorry was trying to look out for Lucy, knowing that she didn't have feelings for Mr. Stryver. Jarvis Lorry is trying to protect Lucy from a man, that he knows is not good for her. "I don't want dozens of people who are not at all worthy of Ladybird, to come here looking after her,"(pg 101 Ms. Pross)Ms. Pross doesn't like all of the suitors visiting Lucy. She trys to keep them out as she tried to keep Jarvis Lorry out before learning his intentions on Page 100. "let me ask you- does the doctor, in talking with Lucie, never refer to the shoemaking time, yet?" Jarvis Lorry wants to make sure that Lucy doesn't see her father degrading himself by working on shoes again, because that upsets her. Both Jarvis Lorry and Ms. Pross will do almost anything to insure that Lucy is kept safe, and happy.

Marlou Taenzer said...

I think that the first person that posted onto the blog used very good examples especially the following quote "I don't want dozens of people who are not at all worthy of Ladybird, to come here looking for her," (101). Here Miss Pross who is a protector and caretaker of Lucie says that she has no patience for the men that come to visit Lucie because in her opinion none of them are truly worthy of Lucie. She continues to state this opinion in the following quote. "All sorts of people who are not in the least degree worthy of the pet are always turning up" (101). While Miss Pross is talking about this Mr. Lorry is listening quietly and after many remarks of hers says "Indeed?" (100), which leads the reader to believe that he is thinking about everything Miss Pross is saying because he too cares greatly about Lucie.

sam merrens said...

Throughout A Tale of Two Cities, there are many examples of how the upper class is corrupt and its injustice towards the lower class. One of the most prolific examples is when the Monseigneur was in town, and currently was eating his chocolate. He had four servants and a cook help him eat it, but this wasn’t in any way outrageous to Monseigneur.
“It was impossible for Monseigneur to dispense one of these attendants on the chocolate and hold his high place under the admiring Heavens. Deep would have been the blot upon his escutcheon if his chocolate had been ignobly waited on by only three men; he must have died of two.” (110, Dickens)
Here one sees just how corrupt the aristocracy really is, he couldn’t stand to have one bit of his chocolate served to him by only 3 men, while peasants and the lower class scavenge in the streets for any last bit of spilt wine.
Just before the Monseigneur’s party finishes, another marquis stands up and leaves, saying that he was disgusted with the Monseigneur’s haughtiness. The reader starts to believe that there is a possibility that some of the nobility have some sense in them, then the Marquis tells his driver to zip through the streets as fast as he can. Unsurprisingly, a child is crushed and killed under one of the wheels when the carriage hits him. The marquis throws a couple coins to the father, but Defarge throws them back. The marquis then curses them: “I would ride over any of you very willingly, and exterminate you from the earth. If I knew which rascal threw at the carriage, and if that brigand were sufficiently near it, he should be crushed under the wheels” (117, Dickens). This sickening example of what the monarchy has become truly strikes home on all the descriptions by the peasants and revolutionaries, as to what the aristocrats are like.
One of the most disgusting parts of the novel so far was when an aristocrat named Foulon told the starving peasants and people that they “should just eat grass” (221, Dickens). Foulon is obviously so self-centered and corrupt that he believes that the lower class should eat grass, but he can eat four-course meals and have servants at his heels.

I agree with Parker Gardner on all points.

David Desaulniers said...

I agree with Haiti and Anthony with the statements that both Jarvis Lorry and Ms. Pross do love, care, and protect Lucy. This is quite obvious for Jarvis since he goes far out of his way to take Lucy to Paris to meet her father. He didn't have to do it because he's just a banker, but he has stronger feelings for her than just to be a messenger. He feels entitled and chosen to protect Lucy and help her. He originally though was just carrying a message, "But he has been - been found. He is alive" (p.34). This news didn't sit well with Lucy though and she fainted. I think Jarvis thought at this point that it was his duty to help her through this process of getting Lucy to Paris where her father was. And also when Lucy fainted Ms. Pross was there to help and directing others to help, "Why don't you go and fetch things, instead of standing there staring at me?" (p.34). And later on when Ms. Pross and Jarvis are speaking to each other in Lucy's house, "I am very much put out about my lady bird!" (p. 100). This just goes to show that Jarvis and Ms. Pross are the ones who have been and will protect Lucy in A Tale of Two Cities.

David W. said...

I agree with David D. and everyone else who talked about how Mr. Lorry and Ms. Pross care for and protect Lucy Manette. There are a lot of examples that help prove this in the text, and one of them occurs when Ms. Pross says she "[doesn't] want dozens of people who are not at all worthy of Ladybird, to come here looking after her" (101). This shows that she thinks very highly of Lucy and she doesn't think that most people deserve her. An earlier instance of Ms. Pross showing her affection for Lucy is after Lucy faints when she hears that her father is still alive. When Ms. Pross sees that Lucy had fainted, "she softly laid [lucy] on the sofa, and tended her with great skill and gentleness: calling her 'my precious!' and 'my ladybird!'"(35). As for Mr. Lorry, the proof of his caring for Lucy is more subtle and spread out. Mr. Lorry himself wants everyone to think that he is like a machine with no feelings for his customers, but by saying things like "I have no feelings" and explaining to others "that all the realations [he] hold[s] with [his] fellow-creatures are meer business realtions"(32). But despite his efforts to appear as if he does not have feelings for his customers, it is still apparent that he cares for the Manette family by the amount of effort he goes through to ensure Dr. Manettes safety.

Charlie said...

Jarvis Lorry and Ms. Pross both care alot for Lucy Manette. Jarvis is the one to tell Lucy the shocking news that her father has been alive for the last 18 years when she believes that he is dead. "But he has been - been found. He is alive." (p 34). Lucy faints later this scene. After Ms. Pross frantically panics to revive Lucy she is upset with Jarvis for causing Lucy to faint. "Couldn't you tell her what you had to tell her without frightening her to death?" ( p 35). Both David's and many people before me have proved that Jarvis and Ms. Pross care for Lucy. I agree with all of them. Ms. Pross gently cares for Lucy when she is down. "Spreading her golden hair aside over her shoulders with great pride and care" (p 34). This scene shows how both Jarvis and Ms. Pross care for Lucy. There are many other examples after this scene as well, but this is where you get introduced to them.

Daniel said...

The upper class has been a unfairly ruling class. They have left the peasants with nothing and are treating them all badly. It is so bad that it has come to the point where people are starving and are in need for food. "All the people within reach had suspended their business, or idleness, to run to the spot and drink the wine" (36). This shows how the people are so hungry and so poor because they have gotten to the point of drinking wine of the road. One of these aristocrats that showed no sympathy was the Marquis who ran over a child and said "you people cannot take care of yourselves and your children" (116). He is showing that he is superior to all and blames them for the child that he just ran over. He than "threw out a gold coin for the valet to pick up"(116). This showed that he did not care at all about the pesants and thinks that just money could fix what he has just done. The ruling class is corrupted and in the end they should relize that they are not to kind to there own people.

Eleanor S. said...

I agree with Anthony's comment about how the fact that Stryver goes to Jarvis Lorry with his plan to marry Lucie really shows that Mr. Lorry is seen by others as her protector. The scene where he and Miss Pross fret over the swooning Lucie shows that they both care about her deeply, as has already been discussed by several other commenters. While breaking the news of her father's having been found, Mr. Lorry "quietly chafed the hands that held his arm," comforting the distressed girl (34). After she faints, "so close was her hold upon his arm, that he feared to detach himself lest he should hurt her; therefore he called out loudly for assistance without moving" (35). Miss Pross comes rushing in and hits him in the chest, "sending him flying back against the nearest wall" (35). Her speedy, powerful response shows how much she cares about protecting Lucie.
In fact, nearly every character in the book seems to be drawn to care for, either romantically or as a parent figure, the delicate, beautiful young Lucie Manette.

Emily said...

Lucie is portrayed as a delicate character who needs protection. Mr. Lorry and Miss Pross are her protectors. In Book One, when Mr. Lorry reveals to Lucie that her father is alive, and just before she faints, Mr. Lorry "quietly chafed the hands that held his arm" (34);. He was comforting her. When she faints, Miss Pross rushes in to her aid. She calls her "my precious...my bird" (35). This shows the she cares for Lucie. Another example of when Miss Pross shows devotion towards Lucie she says " I am very much put out by my Ladybird" (100). She clearly is stressed about something that is happening to Lucie. Whatever Lucie feels, so does Miss Pross.

Kate Kerin said...

In the TTC Dickens shows how much Jarvis Lorry and Miss Pross love and care for Lucie Manette. Jarvis Lorry acts as a second father to Lucie by bringing her to England, helping her find her father, and always watching out for her. Miss Pross seems cross and short-tempered but she has Lucie's best interest in mind. When Lucie is getting visits from many suitors Miss Pross says "I don't want dozens of people who are not at all worthy of Ladybird, to come here looking after her,"( 101). She says this because she thinks Lucie better than all of them. She also gets upset when Jarvis gives her news that makes Lucie faint, saying, "couldn't you tell her what you had to tell her without frightening her to death? Look at her with her pretty face and cold hands." (35). She is concerned about Lucies well fare and gets upset when people disrupt it. Mr. Lorry is very subtle about his love for Lucie and often denies that he is any thing but her family banker, he says "I have no feelings, and that all the realations I do hold with my fellow-creatures are meer business realtions"(32). He pretends that it is all business but there is no denying that he goes above and beyond your average banker by bringing her to her father, bringing her to England, and always watching over her. I agree with all previous quotes and posts especially Erin's.

Alli said...

In A Tale Of Two Cities, Charles Dickens portrays how much Miss Pross and Jarvis Lorry care about Lucie. They will do anything for her as long as she is happy is safe. Lucie means everything to both of them. Jarvis breaks the news for her that her father is in the Bastille and not dead and she faints. "quietly chafed the hands that held his arm" (34). Jarvis Lorry takes her to France to find him. Miss Pross on the other hand is opinionated but she only wants what is best for Lucie. Miss Pross says, "I don't want dozens of people who are not at all worthy of Ladybird, to come here looking after her,"( 101). Miss Pross is very picky about who will be best for Lucie. It is out of love though. Another example of Miss Pross showing her love to Lucie is when she says, " I am very much put out by my Ladybird" (100). Miss Pross understands Lucie very well and just knows when something is up. Miss Pross loves Lucie and it cannot be changed.